Natural England's application for a fence on Fell End Clouds rejected

A planning inspector has refused Natural England consent to erect a fence around an area of limestone pavement on common land in Upper Eden, known as Fell End Clouds, Cumbria.

Fell End Clouds is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and Special Area of Conservation (SAC) and Natural England  considers that temporary fencing is needed to prevent sheep from grazing on its rare and unusual species of plants .in order to bring it back into “favourable condition”.

Inspector Susan Doran was not satisfied there was enough evidence to suggest that fencing an area for 10 years would lead to long term results. “I recognise the need to improve the condition of the SSSI, and note that there is evidence from similar schemes operating elsewhere of improvements in the early years. However, I have concluded that evidence to support the longer term effect sought is lacking,” she said.

The application proposed a 3.1km-long fence, including sections of existing walls, gates and stiles, would enclose an area of about 100 hectares, a tenth of the whole common. Only Fell ponies and up to 30 cattle would have been allowed inside the boundary so that outstanding flora, which was said to be in decline following decades of being grazed by sheep, could be given a chance to recover.

- See more at: http://www.foundationforcommonland.org.uk/news/430-planning-inspector-refuses-s-36-application-on-common-land-in-cumbria-due-to-impact-on#sthash.zvlqc29W.dpuf

A planning inspector has refused Natural England consent to erect a fence around an area of limestone pavement on common land in Upper Eden, known as Fell End Clouds, Cumbria.

Fell End Clouds is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and Special Area of Conservation (SAC) and Natural England  considers that temporary fencing is needed to prevent sheep from grazing on its rare and unusual species of plants .in order to bring it back into “favourable condition”.

Inspector Susan Doran was not satisfied there was enough evidence to suggest that fencing an area for 10 years would lead to long term results. “I recognise the need to improve the condition of the SSSI, and note that there is evidence from similar schemes operating elsewhere of improvements in the early years. However, I have concluded that evidence to support the longer term effect sought is lacking,” she said.

The application proposed a 3.1km-long fence, including sections of existing walls, gates and stiles, would enclose an area of about 100 hectares, a tenth of the whole common. Only Fell ponies and up to 30 cattle would have been allowed inside the boundary so that outstanding flora, which was said to be in decline following decades of being grazed by sheep, could be given a chance to recover.

- See more at: http://www.foundationforcommonland.org.uk/news/430-planning-inspector-refuses-s-36-application-on-common-land-in-cumbria-due-to-impact-on#sthash.zvlqc29W.dpuf

A planning inspector has refused Natural England consent to erect a fence around an area of limestone pavement on common land in Upper Eden, known as Fell End Clouds, Cumbria.

Fell End Clouds is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and Special Area of Conservation (SAC) and Natural England  considers that temporary fencing is needed to prevent sheep from grazing on its rare and unusual species of plants .in order to bring it back into “favourable condition”.

Inspector Susan Doran was not satisfied there was enough evidence to suggest that fencing an area for 10 years would lead to long term results. “I recognise the need to improve the condition of the SSSI, and note that there is evidence from similar schemes operating elsewhere of improvements in the early years. However, I have concluded that evidence to support the longer term effect sought is lacking,” she said.

The application proposed a 3.1km-long fence, including sections of existing walls, gates and stiles, would enclose an area of about 100 hectares, a tenth of the whole common. Only Fell ponies and up to 30 cattle would have been allowed inside the boundary so that outstanding flora, which was said to be in decline following decades of being grazed by sheep, could be given a chance to recover.

- See more at: http://www.foundationforcommonland.org.uk/news/430-planning-inspector-refuses-s-36-application-on-common-land-in-cumbria-due-to-impact-on#sthash.zvlqc29W.dpuf

A planning inspector has refused Natural England consent to erect a fence around an area of limestone pavement on common land in Upper Eden, known as Fell End Clouds, Cumbria.

Fell End Clouds is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and Special Area of Conservation (SAC) and Natural England  considers that temporary fencing is needed to prevent sheep from grazing on its rare and unusual species of plants .in order to bring it back into “favourable condition”.

Inspector Susan Doran was not satisfied there was enough evidence to suggest that fencing an area for 10 years would lead to long term results. “I recognise the need to improve the condition of the SSSI, and note that there is evidence from similar schemes operating elsewhere of improvements in the early years. However, I have concluded that evidence to support the longer term effect sought is lacking,” she said.

The application proposed a 3.1km-long fence, including sections of existing walls, gates and stiles, would enclose an area of about 100 hectares, a tenth of the whole common. Only Fell ponies and up to 30 cattle would have been allowed inside the boundary so that outstanding flora, which was said to be in decline following decades of being grazed by sheep, could be given a chance to recover.

- See more at: http://www.foundationforcommonland.org.uk/news/430-planning-inspector-refuses-s-36-application-on-common-land-in-cumbria-due-to-impact-on#sthash.zvlqc29W.dpuf

A planning inspector has refused Natural England consent to erect a fence around an area of limestone pavement on common land in Upper Eden, known as Fell End Clouds, Cumbria.

Fell End Clouds is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and Special Area of Conservation (SAC) and Natural England  considers that temporary fencing is needed to prevent sheep from grazing on its rare and unusual species of plants .in order to bring it back into “favourable condition”.

Inspector Susan Doran was not satisfied there was enough evidence to suggest that fencing an area for 10 years would lead to long term results. “I recognise the need to improve the condition of the SSSI, and note that there is evidence from similar schemes operating elsewhere of improvements in the early years. However, I have concluded that evidence to support the longer term effect sought is lacking,” she said.

The application proposed a 3.1km-long fence, including sections of existing walls, gates and stiles, would enclose an area of about 100 hectares, a tenth of the whole common. Only Fell ponies and up to 30 cattle would have been allowed inside the boundary so that outstanding flora, which was said to be in decline following decades of being grazed by sheep, could be given a chance to recover.

- See more at: http://www.foundationforcommonland.org.uk/news/430-planning-inspector-refuses-s-36-application-on-common-land-in-cumbria-due-to-impact-on#sthash.zvlqc29W.dpuf

A planning inspector has refused Natural England consent to erect a fence around an area of limestone pavement  known as Fell End Clouds on Greenrigg common in Upper Eden. One of the main reasons for rejecting Natural England's proposal was that it would have a negative effect on the abiity of the commoners to exercise their rights to graze hefted flocks on the common.

Fell End Clouds is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and Special Area of Conservation (SAC) and Natural England  considers that temporary fencing is needed to prevent sheep from grazing on its rare and unusual species of plants .in order to bring it back into “favourable condition”.

Inspector Susan Doran was not satisfied there was enough evidence to suggest that fencing an area for 10 years would lead to long term results. “I recognise the need to improve the condition of the SSSI, and note that there is evidence from similar schemes operating elsewhere of improvements in the early years. However, I have concluded that evidence to support the longer term effect sought is lacking,” she said.

The application proposed a 3.1km-long fence, including sections of existing walls, gates and stiles, would enclose an area of about 100 hectares, a tenth of the whole common. Only Fell ponies and up to 30 cattle would have been allowed inside the boundary so that outstanding flora, which was said to be in decline following decades of being grazed by sheep, could be given a chance to recover.

Wild Boar Fell Graziers’ Association objected to the location of the fence. It would have an adverse effect on the existing agricultural management of the common and especially the hefts on the north west part of Greenrigg Common. In all, seven flocks woudl be affected by the proposal — four of the graziers’ hefts are located in the Clouds area of the common including two whose hefts would effectively be removed, with a further three hefts affected by the proposal. A further concern was that if carried out this proposal could breach individuals’ tenancy agreements. They suggested an alternative location for the fence to minimise its impact on the managemnet of the fell.

The planning inspector concluded: "In reaching my conclusion, I appreciate the difficulty of finding a solution that is acceptable to everyone and that inevitably there will have to be compromise. I recognise that the application proposal is a compromise. However, I am not satisfied that the application before me is the appropriate solution given that the Graziers’ Association, in putting forward an alternative proposal, feels unable to support it. I have concluded that there would be a negative effect on the ability of commoners to exercise their rights with regard to hefted flocks and the management of livestock on the Common. I recognise the need to improve the condition of the SSSI, and note that there is evidence from similar schemes operating elsewhere of improvements in the early years. However, I have concluded that evidence to support the longer term effect sought is lacking. Having considered all the matters above, and for the reasons given, I conclude that this application should be refused."

You can download the application and the decision here